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North American Landscape Trees sample pages

Below is the content from pages 211 and 212 of North American Landscape Trees. A few updates or corrections are indicated in red.

FRAXINUS
[OLEACEÆ; Olive Family] 60-70 spp. of shrubs and trees, nearly all of temperate regions, known as ash trees, from Anglo-Saxon æsc. Most are deciduous, bearing compound, opposite leaves. Cultivated primarily as handsome shade trees; a few smaller species bear showy white flowers. Drawbacks are that ashes often leaf out very late in spring, and meanwhile may look stiff and graceless. They usually bear inconspicuous flowers, the sexes often on separate trees. Females can bear numerous unsightly seed clusters. The seeds are dry "keys" with wings like canoe paddles. Fraxinus is an ancient Latin name of F. excelsior, in turn from Greek fraxis, a fence, referring to its early use to divide property and mark boundaries. Trees known as mountain ashes are genus Sorbus, in the Rose Family. Genera related to Fraxinus include Chionanthus (fringetree), Ligustrum (privet), Olea (olive), Osmanthus, Phillyrea, and Syringa (lilac).

F. alba -- see F. americana

F. americana L.
= F. alba Marsh.
= F. biltmoreana Beadle
= F. juglandifolia Lam.
= F. excelsior 'Juglandifolia'
White ash. American ash. From the eastern half of the U.S., and S Ontario. An abundant and familiar species. Important in forestry and horticulture. An airier and nobler tree than green / red ash (F. pennsylvanica). Fall color often bronzy or deep purple, rarely pure yellow, usually at least a pinkish cast near the branch ends. Leaflets (5) 7-9 (13), slightly, or not toothed; usually hairless; pale beneath (hence the name white ash). Bark ash-gray, ridged in diamond furrows. Records: to 175' tall in the wild; 152' x 12'11" x 66' Union, IL (1982); 114' x 20'5" x 126' Lenawee County, MI (1976); 95' x 25'4" x 83' Palisades, NY (1983); a trunk 28'0" around in Wabash County, IN (<1882).

F. americana Autumn Applause® PP 3769 (1976)
Introduced by Wandell nursery of Urbana, IL. Common. Fall color deep purple or mahogany -- some claim it to be the best fall color of all white ashes. Leaflets smaller than usual, somewhat drooping. Compact widely rounded crown, 45' tall. Seedless.

F. americana 'Autumn Blaze'
= F. americana 'Blaze'
A selection made at Morden Research Station of Manitoba. Introduced in 1982, after 10 years of testing. The first white ash introduced because of its adaptability to the prairie region. Late to flush in spring. Form oval. Fall color purple. Few seeds produced.

F. americana Autumn PurpleTM
= F. americana 'Junginger'
Discovered at the University of Wisconsin, Madison, by Karl Junginger (1905-1991) of McKay nursery, Waterloo, WI. Introduced in 1956. Common. Rapid growth. Rounded habit. Seedless. Heavy dark green foliage, of pronounced deep purple or mahogany in fall, or mottled yellow-orange.

F. americana 'Blaze' -- see F. americana 'Autumn Blaze'

F. americana 'Blue Mountain'
Introduced 1985-86 by Handy nursery of Portland, OR. Out of commerce. Perfect branching habit. Foliage deep green and glossy, deep burgundy in fall. Believed to be seedless.

F. americana 'Champaign County' PP 3762 (1975)
Introduced by Wandell nursery of Urbana, Champaign County, IL. Common. Strong, straight and vigorous. Dense crown. Develops a heavy trunk and robust branch system nurseries appreciate. Large lustrous dark green leaves with leathery texture. The original tree at 18 years had not yet flowered -- its sex was unknown in 1981. Bronze or yellowish fall color.

F. americana 'Chicago Regal'
Selected as a wild seedling in 1970 by R.G. Klehm of South Barrington, IL. Introduced to commerce in 1986. Tree vigorous; branching upright. Bark resists frost cracking. Leaf deep green in summer. Fall color regal purple with earth tones.

F. americana CimmaronTM® PP 8077 (1992)
= F. americana 'Cimmzam'
= F. pennsylvanica 'Cimmzam'
Introduced in 1991 as a green ash. Common. Strong trunk and branch system. Thick waxy green foliage. First deep burgundy in September, then fiery brick-red in October, finally flaming orange. Seedless.

F. americana 'Elk Grove'
In 1968, R.G. Klehm of South Barrington, IL, selected this as a wild seedling from Busse Woods, Elk Grove, IL. Introduced to commerce in 1985. Tree vigorous; branching upright. Bark resists frost cracking. Leaf lustrous dark green in summer. Fall color rich royal purple. See also F. americana 'Royal Purple'.

F. americana 'Empire
Introduced 1988 by Schichtel nursery of Orchard Park, NY. Fall color purple. Very vigorous. Dominant central leader. To 65' tall x 40' wide.

F. americana Greenspire®
= F. americana 'PNI 2331'
Introduced 1990 by Princeton nursery of New Jersey. Narrow upright habit. Fall color dark orange.

F. americana 'Hillcrest'
Listed in 1977 without description by Siebenthaler nursery of Dayton, OH. Out of commerce.

F. americana 'Junginger' -- see F. americana Autumn PurpleTM

F. americana 'Kleinburg'
Discovered in Keinburg, Ontario. Described in 1970. Offered by Sheridan nursery in 1973. Still in commerce until at least 1987. Rare; sold mostly in Canada. Compact upright growth to 50' tall. Dependable on heavy soils. Ideal for uniform street plantings.

F. americana 'Manitou'
Introduced in 1976 by Sheridan nursery of Oakville, Ontario. Still in commerce as of 19891997. Sold primarily in Canada. Habit decidedly columnar. Grows well in heavy clay. Good purplish fall color. Probably named for the town of Manitou, southwest of Winnipeg, Manitoba.

F. americana 'Newport' -- see F. pennsylvanica 'Newport'

F. americana 'PNI 2331' -- see F. americana Greenspire®

F. americana 'Rosehill' PP 2678 (1966)
A chance seedling recognized as outstanding by E. Asjes, Jr., of Rosehill Gardens, Kansas City, MO. Common. Rapid, straight growth; wide angle crotching habit of lateral branches makes the tree broad. Foliage dark green; yellow, pink, or fiery bronze-red in fall. Tolerates poor, alkaline soil. Transplants well. Seedless.

F. americana 'Royal Purple'
= F. pennsylvanica 'Royal Purple'
In 1968, R.G. Klehm of South Barrington, IL, selected this as a wild seedling from Busse Woods, Elk Grove, IL. Introduced to commerce in 1985. Rare. Fall color royal purple. Growth shapely, upright. Bark resists frost cracking. This cultivar has also been listed under F. pennsylvanica, yet the fall color indicates that it belongs here. Its origin and description are suspiciously similar to those of F. americana 'Elk Grove'.

F. americana 'Skycole' -- see F. americana Skyline®

F. americana Skyline® PP 4756 (1981)
= F. americana 'Skycole'
Developed and introduced by American Garden Cole of Circleville, OH. Common. Strong upright branches. Compact oval to globular crown. Fall color orange-red. Seedless.

F. americana 'Suburban'
Introduced 1992 by W. Wandell of Urbana, IL.

F. americana var. texensis -- see F. texensis

F. americana 'Tures' -- see F. americana Windy CityTM

F. americana 'Waverly'
Selected near Bowmanville, Ontario. Described in 1970. Out of commerce. Compact.

F. americana Windy CityTM
= F. americana 'Tures'
From Matt Tures Sons nursery of Huntley, IL. Introduced 1994-95 by Chicagoland Grows®, Inc., of Illinois. Oval habit; strong central leader. Resists frost cracking. Burgundy fall color.

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Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert
Arthur Lee Jacobson plant expert

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